History, Religion, etc.

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History, Religion, etc.

Postby Michael Xanthios » Tue Oct 17, 2006 11:21 pm

Where does the name Britain come from?
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Postby Jamie Harrison » Wed Oct 18, 2006 9:40 am

It is Wikipedia, so take it with a grain of salt (or two):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Britain
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Discussion, discussion

Postby Michael Xanthios » Wed Oct 18, 2006 10:47 am

Discussion, discussion...let's get involved.

So Britannia was named by the Romans as in the Roman province of Britannia.

Any thoughts about the stone and wood henges?
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Postby Jamie Harrison » Wed Oct 18, 2006 11:40 am

Must do actual work today...

But . . . Simon Shama, professor of art history and history at Columbia University, did a very interesting documentary called A History of Britain detailing the origins of Londinium as a Roman trading post, the migration of the Picts, the Saxons, Normans, etc..., as well as the transformation of tribal chieftains into todays aristocracy, topped off with the monarchy. Highly recommend it.

Question: if the Romans named Britain Britannia to honour the Roman province, is the same true of Romania?
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Latins in a sea of Slavs

Postby Michael Xanthios » Wed Oct 18, 2006 9:23 pm

I looked it up on Wikipedia: Romania started as a community left behind by a Roman military outpost. Romanians are "Latins in a sea of Slavs". The homes of Slavs stretch from Albania to Ukraine. Interestingly, the main religion of Romania is Orthodox Christianity, not Roman Catholicism.

From Byzantium: The Early Centuries (John Julius Norwich) - In the early 300s, the Roman emperor Constantine decided to create an eastern military capital to rival the western capital of Rome. He created Constantinople (modern Istanbul) near the village of Byzos (from where the name Byzantium came). He, thereby, successfully divided the empire into the western Roman Empire and eastern Byzantine Empire. [I'm getting somewhere with this.]

Constantine accepted Christianity into the empire, so imperial Christendom was born. There were many political and religious problems to come between the two empires during the following centuries. Finally, the Church was divided between eastern Constantinople and western Rome, thus, giving rise to the Roman Catholic church and Byzantine Orthodox church.

The Byzantine Orthodox church subdivided by ethnic group, so today we have Greek Orthodoxy, Russian Orthodoxy, Coptic Orthodoxy, etc. This includes Romanian Orthodoxy which survives to this day.

I read that book years ago. I knew it would come in handy some day. LOL

Mike

P.S. I have a comment on stone henge to come. Admittedly, its a bit of pseudohistory from Uriel's Machine (Lomas, Knight).
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Postby jester1-2 » Thu Oct 19, 2006 8:11 am

So if you order a large burger and large fries why bother getting a diet coke???? :shock: 8) 8)
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What Constantine said

Postby Michael Xanthios » Thu Oct 19, 2006 9:47 am

To accomodate for the extra calories...that's what Constantine said anyway.
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Uriel's Machine

Postby Michael Xanthios » Thu Oct 19, 2006 1:03 pm

Lomas and Knight, in the book Uriel's Machine, assert that the Book of Enoch (http://www.sacred-texts.com/bib/boe/) records that an archangel by the name of Uriel warned Enoch about the impending flood and gave him instructions for building a machine, Stonehenge, to predict the time of the flood. Enoch is the grandfather of Noah.

The Book of Enoch is an apocolyptic text dated at about the second century BC. It is considered apocryphal by modern Christendom though it is referred to in one of the letters of the New Testament.

In the Book of Enoch, the author writes about a band of angels, led by Lucifer, who bound themselves in an oath to descend upon the Earth to take for themselves wives, because they lusted for the women of humanity. Supposedly, this occurred in human prehistory. The angels-come-demons were known as the Watchers. Their offspring were giants in the land and consumed resources beyond supply. Interestingly enough, the Book of Genesis discusses Enoch and mentions that there were giants in those times. Otherwise, it mentions little else other than to say that Enoch walked with God and did not die. It's strange how little is written about one of only two men to be taken alive into heaven. If you read it, it seems as if passages have been removed.

The Watchers whom are named are attributed to have given knowledge to mankind, each demon specialising. Wars and weapon making were attributed. Face painting as a deception of beauty was attributed. Sorceries and spells were attributed, and other things too.

God was displeased with the Watchers and decided to wipe out the race of Giants with a great flood. This flood is suggested to be the flood of Noah.

This is all from the top of my head. Uriel's Machine was an interesting read, but is probably just fantasy. Who's to say?

Mike
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Postby Aligreen » Thu Oct 19, 2006 1:53 pm

jesteronetwo wrote:So if you order a large burger and large fries why bother getting a diet coke???? :shock: 8) 8)


I for one try to stay away from all of the grease. But the methology behind the diet Coke is quite simple for myself anyway, it's all in the taste. I haven't drunk a regular Coke with sugar and caffeine in it in I can't remember how long. Coke is far too sweet and therefore repulsive. It's like double sweetening your coffee by mistake.
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Diet Coke

Postby Michael Xanthios » Thu Oct 19, 2006 3:32 pm

Me too. It's diet Coke, but I do use caffeine to self-medicate for my ADD.
Last edited by Michael Xanthios on Sat Oct 21, 2006 12:07 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby jester1-2 » Fri Oct 20, 2006 5:16 am

Hey testosterone are you from g-town?


Well if you mean me and not Ali then yes but from the dumber part of town............ :? :?
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Anti-Chinese

Postby Michael Xanthios » Fri Oct 20, 2006 10:53 am

Did you know that in the north-western part of China exists a community of Muslim Caucasians? They are currently under persecution for their religion. One of their community, a Canadian citizen, is now in a Chinese jail for promoting his religion, an act seen by the government as anti-Chinese.

As an aside: As Euro-centred persons, we often forget that there are Causcasians from outside of Europe. The theory is that the group of ancestors that originally left Africa travelled to central Eurasia; from there another group travelled into Europe; another group still travelled to central and eastern Asia to populate China and surrounding areas; another group travelled north to become the Inuit and the Yup'ik. They in turn populated North and South America. It is all proven by genetics.

Mike
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The Race Myth

Postby Michael Xanthios » Sat Oct 21, 2006 12:45 am

Did you know that "race" is a myth?

There are no genetic markers for race or ethnicity. In fact, it has been shown that a Swedish man was far more genetically similar to an African woman than to his Swedish neighbour. (See The Seven Daughters of Eve - Bryan Sykes: a geneticist out of Oxford University)

In a genetic survey of mitochondrial DNA, a Scottish man was found to have a long distant maternal descendent from Polynesia. Mitochondrial DNA remains relatively unchanged for tens of thousands of years and is passed only from mother to child. There was an unbroken line from the Scottish man's mother to the Polynesian woman of thousands of years ago. We can all have this check done to see from which of the daughters of Eve we are descendent. (See http://oxfordancestors.com/)

Genetic Diversity - Of all of the peoples of the world, the African peoples have the most genetic diversity by a factor of over one hundred. It seems that the cradle of humanity has the most diverse DNA.

Also from Sykes: Adam's Curse - Sykes explains how it is possible in time for humanity to procreate without the males of the species. For example, we are close to performing the cloning of a child from the eggs of two women using X-chromosome with X-chromosome creating another female. There would be no need for men to do their dirty work and would become extinct. I'll bet the world would be a much nicer place.

Sykes did a study of the genetics of the Scots. He found that forty percent of the population was actually descendent from the Vikings (Denmark), because of the Viking conquests.

He also found many cases where there were problems with the pairing of the X- and Y-chromosomes to produce the genders. Apparently, it is not the entire Y-chromosome that determines the male gender and only a piece from the arm of the molecule. That piece has broken off to join onto an X-chromosome, so that a fetus forms with two X-chromosomes, one with the Y-piece connected to it. The child grows to become an effeminate man. Sykes argues that this shows the genetic basis for homosexuality. There is a similar example for a masculine female.

Mike
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Postby jester1-2 » Sat Oct 21, 2006 4:18 am

Did you know:

YOU---your parents=2---you grandparents=4---you great-grandparents=8---your great-great-grandparents=16. If you carry this on after 10 generations EACH person has 1024 ancesters. After 20 generations you all have 1,048,576 ancesters. If you allow 70 years for a generation that is 1.400 years into the past not even back to the Romans. Back another 5 generations 1,900 years you will have 33,554,432 ancesters. My point is that far enough back every person in the world will have more ancesters than there has been humans that ever existed. We are ALL related to each other, cousins however distant. ...... :shock: :shock:
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Postby Michael Xanthios » Sat Oct 21, 2006 6:18 pm

Yes, and try 20 years per generation.
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Postby jester1-2 » Sat Oct 21, 2006 7:05 pm

Yes, and try 20 years per generation.


Just means your ancesters multiplied faster........... :lol: :lol:
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Picts

Postby Michael Xanthios » Sun Oct 22, 2006 12:05 am

Not many persons have children at 70 years old.

You really are in a rush to join the Picts.
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December 25th

Postby Michael Xanthios » Mon Oct 23, 2006 7:57 pm

Is December 25th the day Christ was born? Probably not.

When Constantine converted the empire to Christianity in the 300s, he had the problem of a very popular year end pagan festival with which to contend. I think it was the festival of wine or something. Anyway, it was replaced with Christmas so the citizens still had a reason to celebrate.

Mike
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Postby Jamie Harrison » Tue Oct 24, 2006 9:57 am

Even conservative theologians estimate that Christ's birth was likely in July and that Gregorian calendar, which replaced the Julian calendar, is off by seven to 10 years.
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365 days per year

Postby Michael Xanthios » Tue Oct 24, 2006 9:59 pm

Right...Julian: 360 days per year...Gregorian: 365 days per year. Again with the Roman Empire.
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Empire

Postby Guest » Wed Oct 25, 2006 12:10 pm

Good morning from the coast..

Here's something for you all to chew on...
I feel like I'm re-living the Roman empire residing in the US....thoughts
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Postby Jamie Harrison » Wed Oct 25, 2006 1:15 pm

Ye gods, it doth amaze me,
A man of such a feeble temper should
So get the start of the majestic world,
And bear the palm alone.
-- Julius Caesar (1.2.129)


What does Newton's second law tell us? Simply: what goes up must soon come down. Empires fall. The Roman, British and Napoleanic empires all rose mightily and had good runs. Eventually, each collapsed under its own weight. The bad news is that such implosions do not happen instantaneously but usually as a result of hubris, leading to a loss of influence, several brutal attempts to regain and retain diminishing power and the onset of external events and outside influences.

The diminution of the Napoleanic and British empires were largely brought about after they had spent decades battling eachother to acquire and maintain colonial properties. When, in the case of the British Empire, one of those properties rebelled at being overburdened by financing British dominance, it rose up and aided the long slide toward the end of British dominance in the mid-20th century. If we are doomed to repeat history, the American government is wasting its time on places like Iraq and Afganistan and should be far more concerned by the emergence of the so-call BRIC nations (Brazil, Russia, India and China).
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Holy Roman Empire

Postby Michael Xanthios » Wed Oct 25, 2006 1:20 pm

Different empires in history have been dominant. There are similarities. Perhaps, instead of the Holy Roman Empire, we have the Holy American Empire. I've heard the experts say that the signs are there for an end to this empire as all empires must come to an end. There is the EU that emerges as an example to the world as an association of countries and economic world power (European Dream, Jeremy Rifkin). Americans tend to be in debt while Europeans are less plastic indebted and have more savings. The problem facing both America and Europe is population; it's not growing fast enough. That leaves the sleeping giant China. They might emerge as the next economic world power.

Mike
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Slow but sure

Postby Guest » Wed Oct 25, 2006 3:54 pm

Yes China.....it's just over there waiting...slowing taking over BC
Richmond BC is the new china town.....was not like that 5 years ago, maybe I'm wrong.
Any west coasters care to add??
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Postby Guest » Wed Oct 25, 2006 7:09 pm

When I was with Chemlawn in the 1980s, the Markham area was very heavily populated with Orientals, in fact I had the powers to be, have Chinese added to our brochure. But it was not poor people living there, what amazed me is that at that time house price in that area were pushing $400,000.00 plus and several of my Oriental clients (mid Thirties) outright owned their homes, my son goes with a young lady from Richmond Hill and he tells me that it is that way there now. And I see more and more signs of Banks, Insurance companies from over there advertising they have operations here. Perhaps you are correct, they might just be that sleeping giant that is getting things in place before the alarm goes off.
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